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  • Writer's pictureSimona

Best Hiking Trails in Whidbey Island


Whidbey Island offers a range of hiking trails for visitors to explore. Here are some of the best hiking trails on Whidbey Island:

  • Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve: This is a popular destination for hikers of all skill levels. It offers stunning views of the Olympic Mountains and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The trail is a 3.5-mile loop that takes hikers along the beach, through prairies, and past historic farms. The trail begins at the Prairie Overlook, which offers stunning views of the surrounding farmland and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. From there, hikers descend through the prairie to the beach below. Once on the beach, hikers can walk along the shoreline, taking in views of the Olympic Mountains and Admiralty Inlet. The beach is also a popular spot for birdwatching, with a variety of seabirds and shorebirds often spotted in the area.

  • Fort Casey State Park: This park is home to several hiking trails, including the Bluff Trail, a 2.5-mile loop that takes hikers along the bluff and offers stunning views of Admiralty Inlet and the Olympic Mountains. The trail starts at the historic Admiralty Head Lighthouse and winds through the forest before reaching the bluff. Along the way, hikers can explore the gun batteries and other historic sites that are scattered throughout the park. Another popular trail at Fort Casey is the Keystone Spit Trail, a 2.2-mile out-and-back trail that takes hikers along the coastline of Keystone Spit. The trail begins at the Keystone ferry terminal and winds through the forest before reaching the spit. From there, hikers can walk along the beach and take in views of the surrounding waterways.

  • Deception Pass State Park: This park is located on both Whidbey Island and Fidalgo Island and offers a variety of hiking trails. One of the most popular trails at Deception Pass is the Goose Rock Trail, a 2.6-mile loop that takes hikers to the summit of Goose Rock. The trail offers stunning views of the surrounding islands and waterways, including Rosario Strait and Deception Pass. At the summit, hikers can take in panoramic views of the area from the observation platform. For those looking for a longer hike, the park offers the Pacific Northwest Trail, a 1,200-mile trail that stretches from Montana to Washington. The section of the trail that runs through Deception Pass is a 20-mile section that offers hikers a chance to explore the park's natural beauty and historic sites. In addition to these trails, Deception Pass State Park offers several other hiking trails that take visitors through the park's forests, wetlands, and coastline.

  • Dugualla Bay: The Dugualla Bay Hiking Trail is a moderate 2.5-mile out-and-back trail that begins at the Dugualla State Park parking lot and follows the coastline along Dugualla Bay. The trail is well-maintained and features stunning views of the bay, with opportunities to see wildlife such as bald eagles, herons, and other shorebirds. Along the trail, you'll pass through dense forests and cross small streams on footbridges. The trail is relatively flat and easy to walk, but there are a few inclines and declines that may challenge some hikers. The trail is open year-round, and visitors can access it during daylight hours. Dogs are allowed on the trail but must be kept on a leash at all times. There are picnic areas and restrooms available at the trailhead, making it a great spot for a day hike or a picnic by the bay.

  • South Whidbey State Park: South Whidbey State Park is a 381-acre park located on the south end of Whidbey Island. The park offers visitors a variety of hiking trails that wind through forests, along the coastline, and past historic sites. One of the most popular trails at South Whidbey State Park is the South Whidbey Trail, a 4.8-mile out-and-back trail that takes hikers along the park's coastline. The trail starts at the park's entrance and winds through the forest before reaching the beach. From there, hikers can walk along the beach and take in views of the surrounding waterways. Another popular trail at South Whidbey State Park is the Beverly Beach Trail, a 1.5-mile out-and-back trail that takes hikers through forests and past wetlands. The trail starts near the park's entrance and winds through a dense forest of Douglas fir and western red cedar trees. Along the way, hikers can see a variety of wildlife, including birds and deer.

Overall, Whidbey Island has a range of hiking trails to suit hikers of all skill levels, from easy walks to more challenging hikes with stunning views


Below are my favorite hiking trails. Which ones are yours?




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